Are you as worried about the next generation of Americans as I am? I think there is good cause to be.

We all know that today’s schoolchildren don’t compare very well academically to students in many other countries. In a recent comparison of academic performance in 57 countries, American students ranked just about in the middle. 16 other countries beat our kids’ scores in science, and 23 in math. Obviously, American students need to be taught better, and have to work harder, to move ahead in the worldwide pack.

And while I think we need to help them improve scholastically, I’m even more concerned about what we are teaching them! I’m talking about the lessons they are picking up from our idiotic thirst for political correctness.

Case in point – In New York City, a fourth grade boy was suspended for sticking a Post-It note on another boy’s back that said “Kick Me.” Hey, we’ve all pulled silly pranks like that, but suddenly, it is considered bullying.

I don’t like bullies, but was this really bullying? When I did the same thing, it was to one of my best buddies. He reciprocated by throwing a bunch of live earthworms into my lunchbox two days later. Kid stuff, and nobody was harmed. Today, it’s an “incident.”

Another case to consider – When a young California soldier returned from a tour of duty in Afghanistan, he was invited by one of his former high school teachers to come to his class and talk about his experiences in the war.

When the young man arrived at the school, wearing his dress uniform, he was told that he must remove his Combat Infantryman’s Badge from his uniform, because the award depicts a musket surrounded by an oak wreath. Only members of the Infantry, who have served in combat, are awarded the badge, and to most who wear it, it is a cherished symbol of their service.

combat-infantryman-badge[1]

The school system has a zero tolerance policy for guns or images of guns on school property. When the soldier refused to take the decoration off his uniform, he was asked to leave the school grounds.

Yes, this is certainly a message we need to send our kids, isn’t it? You can serve your country, even fight for it, but back home, we don’t want to acknowledge that we live in a real world, where brave men and women are willing to kill or be killed to protect the rest of us.

Yet another example, also out of California – A high school teacher was suspended from his job because he rattled a table to get his students attention. An eight grader then called 911 on her cell phone, saying she was scared, and police were dispatched to the school.

None of the other students felt threatened, and when police and the principal arrived in the classroom, the teacher was busy giving his lesson. But because police were called, school district policy required the teacher’s suspension.

Give me a break! More than once, my high school shop teacher, Jim Summers, bounced an eraser off a sleepy student’s head to wake him up, and I had my butt paddled by teachers and principals more than once. It didn’t hurt nearly as bad as what happened when I got back home!

So does this mean that if some lazy kid didn’t do his homework, he can call the cops and say he is afraid, and the teacher gets suspended, while the kid is off the hook?

Whatever happened to discipline in a classroom? Whatever happened to common sense? Whatever happened to respect for our military?  What kind of citizens are we nurturing these days?

Will we become a nation that is afraid of it’s shadow, that has no sense of humor, no integrity, and no spine? We will if this is the future!

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31 Comments on What Are We Teaching Our Kids?

  1. joe says:

    But Nick, when we were kids we fought sometimes, today they have shootouts, and I’m surprised they even invited a soldier to a school. Ever since they took God out of schools, and public places things have went to hell in a hand basket. People had better wake up.

  2. Rod Jurrens says:

    The key phrase here is lack of common sense! A commodity that is severely lacking in a lot of our society today!

  3. Jim says:

    Who started all this PC crap? Who’s going to have the gonads to stop it?
    I know, make Nick or me king for a week, or maybe a month.

  4. Fred Hammer says:

    In 1985, after returning from Christmas vacation in Florida, I remarked to my middle school principal about the bumper stickers visible on certain cars, “My child is an honor student at (Name of School). What a great motivational idea!”

    “Oh no,” the principal declared, “We can’t do that. Think how it will make the other parents and students feel.”

    As Ron White would say, “You can’t fix stupid.”

  5. T & R Martin says:

    We are teaching our kids to call 911 whenever they please even in a school classroom. What are kids doing in class with a cell phone anyway? When the police officer shows up at the school, will they be allowed in? They carry a gun. What if the kid lives in Dayton, OH where the police are being dumbed down to pass the police test? Will the officer be capable of writing the report? Stayed tuned, I’m sure this all must be a dream OR A NIGHTMARE! I miss the good OLD USA.

  6. Muriel Daniels says:

    As some of my elders and I say,’we are glad we are in our later years of life and won’t be here on earth many more years’, because we don’t like what we are seeing with politics and so called political correctness.

  7. Today abou half of our educators??? are stupid and couldn’t get a job anywhere else time for the fathers to make arrangements to kick these jerks butts. woprked for me mor than once even had a liberal teacher quit and leave town after a session with some fathers seemed he was bad mouthing our souldiers during veitnam

  8. Joe Vagott says:

    Nick the America we knew is gone. Honor God,country and family is no more. It is sad what we have lost. Oh,I had one of those teachers that threw erasers to get your attention.

  9. Bob Martel says:

    Thank god for the immigrant kids. Maybe we can get some smart ones that way!

  10. Bob Martel says:

    Oops, meant to capitalize the “G” in God above.

  11. Connie Braidh says:

    Now, you know some of the reasons I quit teaching!!!!!!!!

  12. Gina says:

    My husband loves to tell the story of the bad kid in grammar school, Schoie. Shoie did something bad, no one in class knew what, the principal grabbed Schoie by the collar, and literally kicked his ass all the way out of the classroom and down the hall to the office. Butt meet shoe! Schoie’s mother didn’t complain and thanked the principal for the much needed discipline. Then he got beat when he got home. This is a kid that would firecraker your mailbox, cherry bomb toilets in school, and other mayhem.

  13. Dale says:

    School policies reflect the communities they serve. Perhaps if parents would teach their children respect, and perhaps if parents would care about their child’s learning, and perhaps if parents would respect education, that would be a good place to start.

    The basics of life (respect, love, religion, etc.) are what provide the foundation for the evolution of life throughout our lifetime. As our knowledge advances, a good foundation is what is required for a comfortable adjustment to our increased knowledge, whether it be acceptance of the advance or a recognition that it’s just not for you.

    The biggest problem is when people say that everyone must be the same and that is what the schools have done. It is time to recognize that everyone is different, some smarter academically, some slower academically, but everyone valuable. We must learn to value people for who they are.

  14. Larry says:

    How about this novel approach: getting an education should be considered a privilege, not a “right.” If you don’t behave and follow the rules, you get an exit pass so the teacher can focus on those students who want to learn.

  15. Paul Stough says:

    Our schools are a reflection of the declining value of our children to our culture. Our children are still valuable to us as parents, but to our culture in general they dont have near the value they once did. We no longer as a culture worry about raising the next generation. We know that we can just import them, as we have been doing for the last 40 years or so.

    As the value of our children decline, our over all culture declines, leading to such stupid rules as not allowing a soldier to wear his C.I.B. in a school.

    I for one cant see why anyone would want to be a teacher. Yesterday I was reading the online version of a newspaper near where I grew up. I was appalled reading the police reports involving the local public school. Here is a link to one story. Keep in mind that is a town of only 10,000 people in northwest Iowa: http://www.stormlakepilottribu.....10400.html

    Here is a link from the “Police Blotter” for March 14, 2011
    http://www.stormlakepilottribu.....10405.html

    You do need to know that Storm Lake has a packing plant that has attracted many illegal aliens with the blessing of our government officials.

    If nothing changes Storm Lake is what our whole country is going to look like in a relatively short time.

    Paul

  16. Bob Derivan says:

    Bad Nick, you said “Will we become a nation that is afraid of it’s shadow, that has no sense of humor, no integrity, and no spine? We will if this is the future!” Sad truth is THIS IS THE FUTURE, and as much as teachers and administrators whine when you suggest it, most of them ARE THEM PROBLEM.

  17. Dale says:

    Bob: Parents are an important part of the equation as well.

    When I was a kid, if I got into trouble, just like Nick said, I was in trouble at home. Nowadays, if a child gets into trouble at school, the parents attack the teacher.

    Again, where is personal responsibility?

  18. We’re with Dale 100%! It isn’t “just” the teachers. It isn’t “just” the government. It isn’t “just” today’s kids. It’s all of us, trying to smooth things out so that no one’s feelings ever get hurt, and especially don’t offend the parents, don’t offend the kiddies, don’t offend the voters. I just joined the Board of Directors at the park we live in, and our Board is trying very hard to make the right decisions, and we aren’t a bit afraid of offending some of our residents who don’t follow the program. But we still have to do it withing the confines of the law and of our moral responsibility.

  19. Dave K says:

    Again Bad Nick has hit the “nail on the head”.
    May I suggest the solution>> to this problem !>>>
    You look in the Mirror. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    I was married to a Teacher for 42 years, and the PARENTS were her worst nightmares in getting her job done…….You have no one except yourselves for “politically correct” in todays society. SEMPER FIFE

  20. Paul Stough says:

    BTW, if you are sick of highly paid teachers, read this:

    http://www.stormlakepilottribu.....08236.html

    Paul

  21. Dan says:

    My values are along the line of Dale. I to had some teachers class rooms that demanded respect as soon as the bell rang out.The enforcer was for me the dean of boys and a leather strap. After that you went home!!! That is where you were asked what you did,why you did it. Thus a one way discussion ensued and penalties appraised and put in place.The issue was now closed period.
    Yes we need parents involved.After all LOVE respect,family is what life is all about.
    Nick Thank You

  22. Garry says:

    Bob: Parents are an important part of the equation as well.

    When I was a kid, if I got into trouble, just like Nick said, I was in trouble at home. Nowadays, if a child gets into trouble at school, the parents attack the teacher.

    Again, where is personal responsibility?

    Well I am 63 and thank God my parents didn’t blindly support either the stupid teachers or a couple of bad LEO’s ran across in my youth. I can honestly say that my 5th grade teacher could have had a major bad impact on my life. But then my 6th grade teacher was wonderful. My 8th grade math teacher should have never been allowed in the class room but my 9th grade Algebra teacher was super. As far as I can tell even after all these years and the loss of both my parents they never blindly supported teachers or me but they always tried to support what was right. And for that Thank you Mom and Dad…..

  23. Dale says:

    Garry: It sounds as though your parents were good people with a good prospective of what was important. While respecting teachers was important, it was also important that if their son had been wronged, they supported him when the facts warranted.

    My husband taught for 37 years and was well respected by his peers and the parents. Following is a cute example of what a good teacher and strong parenting is capable of. Our children went to the same elementary school where my husband taught. Our daughter did not like some of the material being covered when she was in kindergarten and was not doing her work. After a discussion with her, her teacher gave her a little time to think things over to decide if she was going to willingly do her work (before contacting us, the parents). When the teacher asked her decision, our daughter asked her teacher if she knew who her father was (being a teacher in the school, that is). When the teacher said yes, our daughter promptly answered to the effect of – okay, I’ll do it your way. I’ll do the work. She knew she would be in big trouble if she did not cooperate and do her school work.

  24. Orvil Hazelton says:

    NICK: You have hit upon a subject that defines the character of our nation. I am proud to have served our nation as a Corpsman in the USN during the Vietnam Conflict. Upon my return to our wonderful country in 1969 I was greeted with hazing and insults. I did then and continue until to this day to hold my head high for my service. Today, Nancy and I have two sons serving as officers in the US Army. Each has served in Iraq and our older son has also served in Afghanistan. I’m sure that they will each serve more tours as required of our combat veterans. About a week following my return from Vietnam, my mother, who was a veteran school teacher herself in the Los Angeles United School District, asked if I would be willing to speak to her senior history class. I was honored. . . some of these same kids would be serving overseas within a year. Times are far different today. . . our combat veterans are vilified. . . discipline and respect are null and void due to the lack of consequences. “You can’t do nuttin to me, I’m a minor” seems to be the youthful rallying cry. Parents leave discipline to the. . . well they won’t tolerate any interference from the outside, yet they are seemingly either too busy or afraid to confront their own progeny. What to do? We can lead by example: example either good or bed! Our children and grandcildren watch our actions and respond accordingly. Protecting our selves and our children doesn’t mean that all negative circumstances can be avoided; it is how we respond to these circumstances that are important. Our children will follow; let’s LEAD. Thanks, as always, oRV

  25. bucky says:

    I agree with what most of the people before me have said. The schools are a direct result of our politicaly correct society.
    This generation of “You Owe Me” citizens will bring this nation to its knees. I fear for the future generations of our children… . I

  26. butterbean carpenter says:

    Howdy Nick,

    I’M EMAILING YOU A SPEECH FROM A ‘SUPPOSEDLY’ CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL , SPEAKING TO THIS VERY THING !!!!

  27. Bill Daines says:

    I wish I could tell you how many complaints I took from Johnny or Sally saying my Daddy or Mommy slapped me, asking why, responded I did this ir did that.
    Then from a parent saying the child’s teacher took the child by the arm marching the child down to the office. ” good for the teacher” Then a parent objects to this.
    I actually think we should go to year long schooling, just maybe the kids will learn a bit more. I hate to think we need school’s run like a boot camp, but then again some one needs to be forceful without fear of prosecution or a call to the PD. Bill D.

  28. Mel says:

    You’ve just touched on the tip of the iceberg as to the reasons I’ve chosen to homeschool my younger daughters.

  29. Garry says:

    Well don’t forget that the last I checked the only college college applicants that had lower average sat scores than Elementary ED majors was Home Economics majors.

    You have to remember where all this political correctness came from. Straight out of the colleges and universities, so I say sure give them our young for the full year, and see if they can turn their minds completely to mush.

    My son and daughter both went to public school and still managed to both complete college and grad school. My daughter is now well one her way to a PHD and I can certainly tell you we had plenty of run ins with teachers over the years. To think that anyone should blindly support teachers is naive at best.

    From the experience I had as a student, parent and now grandparent I would give show 40 percent of the teachers a pink slip, give 40 percent a raise and great big thanks, while 20 percent would fall into the competent range.

    School administrators I think around 90 percent should be shown the door, and never let back in the profession.

    Parents well they don’t have to apply for the job so there isn’t really much you can do about them.

  30. Paul Stough says:

    I would agree that there are many teachers and administrators who should be sent packing. The question is where are you going to find replacements, and are they going to be any better?

    If we want better teachers and administrators we are going to have to pay more to attract them, and I dont see that happening any time soon!

  31. Elaine & Mike says:

    I worry about our future generation of kids, they are spoiled, do not have respect for most things and know that if a teachers does almost anything they do not like all they have to do is complain or call the cops. Parents are to blame. My son’s spent a few years in English school, and learned that respect was the number one thing. Our oldest learned that goofing off and not doing as he was asked meant a trip to the principals office. This also meant meeting the paddle. No it was not just dealt out, we were called to the school and had to OK the punishment, then it was a swift smack on the fanny, Robert learned a quick lesson and never repeated his mistake. It was what he needed. If they tried that here with our pansy school official, they would go to jail. God help this country in the future.

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